Benefits of eating mushrooms

The mushrooms are small pharmaceutical. More than a hundred possible therapeutic effects of mushrooms are known and many current drugs are based on medicinal mushrooms. These are some of the main benefits.

 

NUTRITIONAL POWER

To begin with, mushrooms have a great nutritional profile. They are a good source of vitamin C and multiple B vitamins (especially niacin and riboflavin), in addition to minerals such as copper and selenium.

As it is not vegetable or animal, its protein has intermediate properties, exceeding in biological value the protein of cereals or legumes. Many mushrooms also provide all the essential amino acids.

Several mushrooms have a umami texture and taste similar to meat, making them a good replacement in vegetarian diets.

Like us, mushrooms synthesize vitamin D when exposed to ultraviolet radiation, and although it is vitamin D2, less effective than D3, it is a non-negligible complement.

The mushrooms are low in carbohydrate, being very interesting in ketogenic diets, and their fiber could contribute to improve the diversity of the microbiota.

Beyond the usual nutrients, they are a source of uncommon compounds in other foods, such as different beta-glucans, a type of polysaccharide that provides many of the benefits that we will see below.

IMPROVEMENT OF THE IMMUNE SYSTEM AND DEFENSE AGAINST BACTERIA

For starters, mushrooms provide compounds that directly help fight against different bacteria, and can even be used to treat resistant bacteria.

In mice, supplementing the diet with mushrooms strengthens the adaptive immune system, improving survival against a salmonella infection.

 

WEIGHT LOSS AND BETTER METABOLIC HEALTH

The mushrooms are low in calories but highly satisfying due to their texture and high fiber content. This combination is key to losing weight without going hungry.

In animals, extracts of different mushrooms reduce the accumulation of fat and improve the lipid profile.

At the metabolic level, they appear to improve fatty liver and glucose regulation, also reducing low-grade inflammation that contributes to insulin resistance.